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Wednesday, 21 November 2012

Herbs, Spices Good for Dogs, Cats, Bad for Dogs, Cats - Uses, Dosage



In this article...
1. Introduction
2. General Cautions
3. Herbs and Spices for Dogs
    3.1 Herbs and Spices that are Safe, Beneficial for Dogs
    3.2 Herbs and Spices that are NOT Safe for Dogs
4. Herbs and Spices for Cats 
5. General Guideline for Daily Herbal Intake


1.0 Introduction

There are many herbs and spices that can be added to your dog's and cat's daily diet. Herbs and spices can be very rich in nutrients vital to the daily maintenance of your dog's and cat's health - for example...
  • Boost the immune system;
  • Repel and eliminate insects, parasites and associated symptoms and conditions;
  • Treat and remedy many health conditions - ailments, chronic conditions, viruses etc., help prevent degenerative effects of aging, help prevent  cancer;
  • Help heal wounds;
  • etc.
I use many different herbs and spices on a daily basis to support the health of my dogs and cats.

To ensure that the herb or spice you are using has maximum benefits and efficacy use organic products only.

 
2.0 General Cautions

Before you use any herb or spice on your dog or cat - as part of his'/her's daily diet,as an ingested treatment/remedy or as a topical treatment - understand possible:
  1. Cautions, if any;
  2. Side effects if any; 
  3. Drug interactions if any - if your dog or cat is on any conventional drug;
  4. Interactions between herbs/spices if you are using multiple herbs and spices.
Failure to understand and do items 1. to 4. above can result in your dog or cat experiencing a health threatening adverse reaction.

While certain herbs and spices do not create a hazard by themselves they can interfere with conventional western medicines - for example but not limited to...
  • Aspirin
  • Antibiotics
  • Cardiac drugs
  • Central Nervous System drugs
  • Chemotherapy drugs
  • Diabetic / Hypoglycemic drugs (i.e. Insulin)
  • Diuretics (i.e. Furosemide, Diazide)
  • Drugs changed by the liver;
  • Hormones (i.e. Thyroxine)
  • Steroids
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) i.e. Rimadyl
    • Please note - Turmeric and Curcumin will not degrade the effects of Glucosamine, Chondrotin or MSN, and can be used with Turmeric and Curcumin.
Not all herbs and spices are safe for pregnant or lactating dogs and cats, or for puppies and littens.
Make sure you do your homework or get advise prior to introducing herbs and spices to your dog's , cat's diet/ health care regimen.

3.0 Herbs and Spices for Dogs...
 
3.1 Herbs and Spices That are Safe, Beneficial for Dogs

The following provides a partial list of herbs and spices that are safe for dogs to ingest. Some are also safe and effective for topical applications as well…as noted in section 2.0 above make sure you do your research prior to providing any herb or spice to your dog for ingestion or topical application...

Alfalfa
Aloe Vera multiple health benefits .
Anise multiple health benefits
Arnica Montana multiple health benefits
Astralagus
Bayberry
Barberry Bark
Bilberry
Burdock
Basil multiple health benefits
Beebalm
Bosweilla
Calendula
Catnip 
Cat's Claw multiple health benefits
Cat Thyme
Cayenne
  • Should never be ingested but can be used topically;
  • Topical application:
    • Cayenne in small quantity can be used as a topical treatment; 
    • The Capsaicin from cayenne peppers can be added to creams and gels as capsacin is a natural pain reliever and also has excellent antibacterial properties to help fight infection.
Caraway Seed multiple health benefits
1Chamomile multiple health benefits
Chevril
Chickweed
1Cinnamon multiple health benefits also...
Cilantro (Corriander)
Curcumin - multiple health benefits
  • Curcumin offers an vast array of health benefits
Cress
Dandelion
Dill
Dong Quai multiple health benefits
Echinacea
Eyebright
Flax Seed multiple health benefits also...
1Fennel multiple health benefits  
Galangal
Garlic multiple health benefits also...
Ginger multiple health benefits also...
Gingko
Gloxinia
Green Tea - decafinated multiple health benefits also...
Golden Seal
Hawthorn
Hyssop
Irish Moss
Indian Strawberry
Juniper Berries multiple health benefits
Lavender
Gloxinia
Lemon Balm
Lemon Grass
Lemon Verbena
Licorice multiple health benefits
Lovage
Majoram multiple health benefits
Marshmallow root
Milk Thistle multiple health benefits
Mint
Mullein 
Nettle
Oat
Oregano
Oregon Grape
Parsley multiple health benefits also...
Plaintain
Peppermint
Penny Royal (external use only)
Red Clover
Rooibos Tea multiple health benefits  also...
Rosemary
1Sage
Sarsaparilla
Selfheal (Prunella vulgaris) 
  • safe for dogs that are not pregnant
Skullcap
Slippery Elm multiple health benefits
Spearmint
St. John’s Wort 
Strawberry
Tarragon

Tea Tree Oil
  • Only use in diluted carrier such as almond or olive oil in a ratio of 50:50
  • Not for ingested use! 
  • Only for topical use with great caution and should NOT be ingested by dog via licking, breathing in vapor etc.
Thyme
Thuja
Turmeric - multiple health benefits
 1note - these herbs are safe for pregnant dogs when used as a culinary herb.  Do not use essential oils derived from these herbs as part of a pregnant dog's diet.
Uva Ursi
Valerian
Wormwood (a dewormer that should only be used under the supervision of a holistic
     veterinarian)

3.2 Herbs and Spices That are NOT Safe for Dogs

The following provides a list of some of the herbs that are harmful to dogs…
  • Cocoa
  • Comfrey
  • Paprika
  • Pennyroyal (ingested use)
  • Pepper
  • Salt
  • Tea Tree Oil (must only be used in diluted carrier such as almond or olive oil in a ratio of 50:50)
  • Nutmeg
  • Mace
  • Ma Huang (Ephedra) use under supervision of a holistic veterinarian only.
  • Wormwood (a dewormer that should only ever be used under the supervision of a holistic veterinarian)

4.0 Herbs and Spices for Cats...
 
4.1 Herbs and Spices That are Safe, Beneficial for Cats

The following provides a partial list of herbs and spices that are safe for cats to ingest. Some are also safe and effective for topical applications as well…as noted in section 2.0 above make sure you do your research prior to providing any herb or spice to your cat for ingestion or topical application...

AlfalfaAloe Vera multiple health benefits .
Anise multiple health benefits
Arnica Montana multiple health benefits
Astralagus
Basil multiple health benefits
Beebalm
Bosweilla
Calendula
Catnip 
Cat's Claw multiple health benefits
Cat Thyme
Cayenne
  • Should never be ingested but can be used topically;
  • Topical application:
    • Cayenne in small quantity can be used as a topical treatment; 
    • The Capsaicin from cayenne peppers can be added to creams and gels as capsacin is a natural pain reliever and also has excellent antibacterial properties to help fight infection.
Caraway Seed multiple health benefits
1Chamomile multiple health benefits
Chevril
1Cinnamon multiple health benefits also...
Cilantro (Corriander)
Curcumin - multiple health benefits
  • Curcumin offers an vast array of health benefits
Cress
Dandelion
Dill
Echinacea
Eyebright
Flax Seed multiple health benefits also...
Ginger multiple health benefits also...
Gloxinia
Green Tea - decafinated multiple health benefits also...
Golden Seal
Hawthorn
Hyssop
Indian Strawberry
Juniper Berries multiple health benefits
Lavender
Gloxinia
Lemon Balm
Lemon Verbena
Licorice multiple health benefits
Lovage
Majoram multiple health benefits
Marshmallow root
Milk Thistle multiple health benefits
Mint
Mullein 
Nettle
Oat
Oregano
Oregon Grape
Parsley multiple health benefits also...
Plaintain
Peppermint
Penny Royal
Red Clover
Rooibos Tea multiple health benefits  also...
Rosemary
1Sage
Selfheal (Prunella vulgaris) 
  • safe for dogs that are not pregnant
Slippery Elm multiple health benefits
Spearmint
Strawberry
Tarragon
Thyme
Thuja
Turmeric - multiple health benefits
 1note - these herbs are safe for pregnant dogs when used as a culinary herb.  Do not use essential oils derived from these herbs as part of a pregnant dog's diet.
Valerian
Wormwood (a dewormer that should only be used under the supervision of a holistic
     veterinarian)

5.0 General Guideline for Daily Intake

Based on Dog’s, Cat's Weight

As noted in section 2.0 above make sure you understand all cautions, interactions, side effects, etc. before deciding to use.


Dog’s, Cat’s Weight
Dry Powder
Tea or Infusion
Capsule,
Tablet, Pill
Tincture
pounds (lbs)
tsp
tbs
amount
times/day
amount
times/day
drops
times/day
1-10 lbs
1/16 –
1/8 tsp


1/8 cup
1x to 3x
1/2
1x to 3x
1 -
3
1x to 3x
10-20 lbs
1/8 tsp -
1/4 tsp


1/4 cup
1x to 3x
1/2 -
1
1x to 3x
3 -
5
1x to 3x
20-50 lbs
1/4 tsp -
1 tsp


1/4 cup -
1/2 cup
1x to 3x
1 –
2
1x to 3x
5 -
10
1x to 3x
50-100 lbs
1 tsp -
2 tsp


1/2 cup –
1 cup
1x to 3x
1 –
2
1x to 3x
20
1x to 3x
+100 lbs
2 tsp -

1 tbs
1 cup
1x to 3x
adult
human
dose
1x to 3x
adult
human
dose
1x to 3x
tsp = teaspoon     tbs = tablespoon    times/day = times per day    x = times per day




6.0 Holistic Support

If you require additional support and guidance I would be pleased to assist you via my Holistic Diet, Nutrition Wellness Services:
  • Unbiased Diet, Nutrition, Product Advice is available via this service
  • Diet, Nutrition Wellness Plans are available via this service

50 comments:

  1. What's wrong with paprika or pepper?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Will irritate and inflame the digestive system

      Delete
    2. Is it ok to use paprika as a deterant sprinkled over plants so they don't chew them?

      Delete
  2. But hot peppers like cayenne don't?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cayenne in small quantity as a topical treatment - Capsaicin from cayenne peppers can be added to creams and gels that, when applied to the skin for pain relief and contain excellent antibacterial properties to help fight infection. Should not be ingested but instead can be used topically.


      Delete
  3. I got some salve from a holistic vet for my Dog's hot spot and comfrey is an ingredient in the salve. Should I not use it? Why is Comfrey not safe for dogs?
    Great website by the way! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Comfrey contains small quantities of alkaloids. Alkaloids can cause liver damage and/or cancer if ingested in large quantities or if absorbed via the skin in constant and generous application. For pregnant dogs and their fetus the danger is increased.

      Dr. Harvey's healing Cream for Dogs (which may be what you are using)contains Comfrey along with a host of other herbs...calendula, aloe, rosemary, thyme, chamomile, comfrey, etc. - all of which promote healing. It can be used to help heal cuts, rashes, hot spots and itching. The amount of comfrey in this cream is fine for use on non-pregnant dogs. The inclusion of comfrey would only be an issue if it was applied in large amounts on the dog 365 days a year. Comfrey should not be ingested by dogs so just make sure your dog is not in the habit of licking the cream off.

      Cheers, Karen

      Delete
  4. Ground cloves safe to ingest? I recently read that it is effective in killing the demodex mite eggs. true?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cloves are a natural dewormer, can also be combined with garlic and lemon - you can do a search on my blog to read the article on garlic, and the article on lemon.

      Cloves - 1 clove per every 10 lbs of body weight to deworm.

      As a spray on application - mix some apple cider vinegar (see the article) with some fresh lemon juice, a few cloves of minced garlic and cloves, let sit overnight then sift the liqued and pour into a spray bottle - spray your dog (avoid the eyes).

      Delete
  5. What is the spray-on application of ACV, lemon, garlic, and cloves for?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1) An insect repellant;
      2) A broad spectrum antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic on an area of the skin which you do not want to become infected. Although with the lemon juice and ACV it would be very important to test a spot to make sure that the sting of the application did not create temporary discomfort and pain.

      Delete
  6. Hello,
    Can you tell me if any of these herbs are not good for dogs? Wasabi Japonica, Dioscorea, Wild Cherry Bark, Pleurisy Root, Wood Betony. They are included in a supplement called pH balancer 8.0. He is a cancer patient and cancer prefers an acidic environment in which to thrive, so I am carefully raising my dog`s pH as I need to alkalize his body for a while.

    Thank you,
    Andrew

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wild Cheery Bark - ok
      Wasabi Japonica - can't advise on this one although it is from the same family as Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli etc. which are good for dogs;
      Wood Betony is a heart stimulator and must be used in allowable dosages only
      Dioscorea and Pleurisy Root - have not run into those for use on dogs before - so can't say yes.
      The dosage in the human balancer may not be safe for dogs - I would not recommend using it.

      I would advise you to consider adding the following to your dogs diet to help fight cancer...

      Organic Apple Cider Vinegar is a safe PH balancer
      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/02/apple-cider-is-good-for-your-dog-and.html

      Turmeric
      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/11/turmeric-and-curcumin-good-for-your.html

      Rooibos Tea
      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/11/turmeric-and-curcumin-good-for-your.html

      Fresh Lemon
      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/01/fresh-lemon-good-for-dogs-many-health.html

      If your dog is on commercially made dry dog kibble get him/her off of it ASAP and make home prepared food instead http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/06/home-made-diy-dog-food-recipes-grain.html

      Delete
  7. My small 5# pomeranian loves cherry bomb peppers, and she greedily eats them. She will eat a whole one. It seems like it does something good for her. Should I let her eat those? They are hot, and she eats one faster than I can. They are quite hot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hot peppers can cause inflammation of the GI tract. If you want to give her peppers give her sweet peppers. If she likes vegetables you can find a long list of veggies - that are safe for her, here http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.com/2012/02/fresh-whole-food-for-your-dogs-health.html

      Delete
  8. I like this site. It is very informative, and I found what I was looking for right away. Very impressed:)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Congrats on an excellent job! I have a question: I read many websites saying tea tree oil is great for dogs if you add the oil to dog shampoo. Isn't that correct? Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tea tee oil can be very beneficial but its benefits will be shadowed by unhealthy ingredients if you don;t know what to avoid in pet shampoos - here is some help for you with that...and also recipes for making your own...and using to repel insects...

      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/07/dog-and-pet-shampoo-unsafe-harmful.html

      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/07/diy-recipes-for-safe-natural-herbal.html

      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/05/diy-natural-herbal-homeopathic-flea_18.html

      Delete
  10. Hi Karen, I was wondering if you could give me safety info on any of these herbs- I did not see them on either list: ,Irish moss, chickweed, marshmallow root, bayberry and barberry bark, plantain, golden seal, and rosemary. They are in a lymph cleanse for humans that I would like to give my girl that has lymphoma. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Elizabeth,

      There are a series of things that you need to do to help your girl overcome this - I am not sure if she is undergoing chemo, or what you are feeding her so I will give you some advice that touches on all of those points...

      #1 - Irish moss, chickweed, marshmallow root, bayberry and barberry bark, plantain, golden seal, and rosemary - all ok;

      #2 ...

      Because she has cancer diet and nutrition is even more important than it would normally be!(and also if she is undergoing chemo). There are a few very important steps you need to take to ensure that her body has the best chance to fight the lymphoma as well, if she is undergoing chemo - chemo suppresses her immune system and puts her at risk of acquiring other health issues. Ensuring truly good nutrition helps to offset the effects of chemo and generally give her body the power to fight. Below I will provide you with items that I recommend you add to her daily diet and things that you need to eliminate from her diet and from her immediate environment...

      I would strongly urge you to get her off of commercially made dog food and treats. Especially grain-in and chemical additive (preservatives, food colouring, artificial flavoring etc.foods). She really needs to be on an anti-inflammatory diet, immune system boosting diet...

      I would urge you to get her on good homemade dog food... you can use the grain-free recipe in this article http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.com/2012/06/home-made-diy-dog-food-recipes-grain.html

      Don't use any chemical based house-hold cleaners - read here http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/04/diy-dog-friendly-household-cleaners.html

      Be very careful of the ingredients in tooth paste, dental chews and shampoo that you may use on her...

      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/05/ingredients-in-dog-toothpaste-oral.html

      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/07/dog-and-pet-shampoo-unsafe-harmful.html

      Food Stuffs to Supplement her daily diet...

      Cottage Cheese - minimum of 2 tbsp http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/07/dairy-products-cheese-kefir-yogurt-are.html

      Omega 3 Fatty Acids - select from the list provided in this article http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/06/fatty-acids-for-dogs-omega-3-omega-6.html

      Yogurt or kefir read why and dosage here...
      http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/07/dairy-products-cheese-kefir-yogurt-are.html

      Fresh lemon - read here http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/01/fresh-lemon-good-for-dogs-many-health.html

      Fresh minced garlic - read here - http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/06/garlic-for-dogs-health-benefits.html

      And if she will eat it add some fresh finely chopped berries and papaya

      Turmeric - read here http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/11/turmeric-and-curcumin-good-for-your.html

      If you do this she has a much better chance of fighting side effects and defeating cancer. Keep her on these food stuffs always. Your other dogs would benefit from the same.

      Chicken Liver
      Cook some chicken liver – just fry on low heat in a sauce pan with some olive oil;
      Store in refrigerator;
      Put a small piece on top of food once a day.

      Organic Apple Cider Vinegar - this will help keep her blood PH level in-balance, which she will need if she has always eaten dry dog food (the lack of real meat and the presence of inappropriate food stuffs acidifies a dog's body PH. Cancer loves an acidified environment)http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/02/apple-cider-is-good-for-your-dog-and.html

      Delete
  11. is self heal,prunella vulgaris,safe for dogs?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jeanette - yes selfheal (Prunella vulgaris) is safe for dogs. I have a lot of it in my meadow - and it is flowering right now, its a pretty little plant and offers so many benefits :)

      Delete
    2. p.s. the only caution is don;t use it on a pregnant dog :>)

      Delete
  12. Dear Karen;
    First time on your page. Liked your mission statement.
    Question: Three no no's on your list, hot cayenne pepper, black pepper and salt.
    I use hot cayenne and black pepper, turmeric, cumin, cinnamon, sea salt, garlic and ginger extensively in my own diet, for their many health benefits.
    I make my dog's food (meat, whole grain, vegetable, spice). I assume that my dog will derive the same benefits that I do from those spices.
    Tumeric needs the pepperine from black pepper to work efficiently (anti-inflammatory).
    Hot cayenne pepper acts as a natural anti-parasite, among other things.
    Sea salt contains many minerals and trace metals, lacking in 'agribizfood'.
    Could you address these three spices in the context I presented them, ie., a dog's need for (sea) salt and how much, if turmeric works enough without the pepperine, etc. and offer alternatives to pharmacological produced wormers, etc.
    Thank you,
    Dan Mancuso
    Chilanko Forks, BC

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Dan,

      HERBS & SPICES

      My dogs get turmeric, basil, sage, camomile, mint, ginger, garlic, rosemary, anise, fennel, rooibos tea, etc.

      While hot cayenne is a natural dewormer, it is very strong and can cause inflammation of the intestines, GI tract as can pepper (black, red, green etc.) While some dogs can tolerate pepper and cayenne many cannot. There is a vast host of other natural dewormers that also provide many other health benefits to dogs you can read all about the many natural interventions for worms and other parasites, insects. Go to my index page http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/p/index-of-articles.html, scroll down to ‘PART 4 – HEALTH CARE’ keep scrolling until you come to 4.2.2 INSECTS & PARASITES, prevention, treatment, remedy. There you will find an entire series of articles providing you with a multitude of herbal, homeopathic and food options for deworming, insects repellents etc. Here is just one in the series of articles http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/07/foods-that-help-your-dogcat-naturally.html There is also one on deworming and dewormers.

      My article on turmeric and curcumin http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/11/turmeric-and-curcumin-good-for-your.html recommends that the bioavailability of turmeric can be supported by serving the turmeric with coconut oil – so you do have another alternative to black pepper for this as well, take a read of the article, you can also read my article on coconut oil http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/02/coconut-oil-is-good-for-your-dogs.html

      PEOPLE FOOD IS GOOD FOR DOGS - people food is animal food :>) but…

      Your assumption that your dog will derive the same benefits from all the foods stuffs that you do is primarily right – but there are some differences…

      1) Grains are not the best choice for a dog – although grass is part of a dog’s natural diet the seed of the grass (grain) is not. While dog's in their natural state would ingest small amounts of grain when they consumed the stomach contents of prey, grain represented an infinitesimal portion of daily food intake. A dog's GI tract is not set-up to derive nutrition for grains and while some dogs do ok on grains there are many healthier more nutritious alternatives – the grain-free recipe in this article provides good examples... http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/06/home-made-diy-dog-food-recipes-grain.html

      2) There are many fresh foods that are good for your dog – this article provides a good list http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/02/fresh-whole-food-for-your-dogs-health.html

      3) There are other foods that should never be given to your dog or should be used with caution – this article provides a comprehensive list and the reason behind why the food is on the list http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/02/foods-that-dogs-should-never-eat.html

      SALT (SODIUM) and IODINE
      In their natural environment, on their natural diet dogs derived sufficient salt from the food that they ate. I don’t add additional salt to my dogs’ diet. They ingest sufficient salt from the various foods in their daily diet – foods such as cottage cheese and cheese. Salt must be ingested with iodine. My dogs also eat on a daily basis - fish, berries such as strawberries, cottage cheese, etc. from which they derive iodine. If a dog is on a naturally well balanced diet they will ingest enough salt from the food and will not require additional salt in their diet.

      Hope this helps. Dan I think you might enjoy reading the many articles on nutrition which you can find on my index page - you will find other good things to add to your dog's diet...

      Cheers, Karen

      Delete
  13. Which part of Anise, Cilantro, Fennel can use to dog diet? Seeds or plants?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anise
      Fresh - use the bulb of the plant
      Dry - use the seeds

      Cilantro
      Fresh - use the green leaf and stems
      Dry - seeds or leaf

      Fennel
      Dry - use the seeds

      This recipe uses both anise and fennel in dry (seed) form, you could also use them in fresh form in this recipe http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/06/home-made-diy-dog-food-recipes-grain.html

      This article explains how to ensure that your dog gets the best nutritional benefit from fresh food (fruit, vegetables, herbs http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/02/fresh-whole-food-for-your-dogs-health.html

      Delete
  14. Hi Karen, I have a male dachshund that was diagnosed with sards on 8/8/13. I have started making his food and treats, increased certain vitamins and digestive enzymes. I have researched and in the natural vet field it is believed that this is a auto immune disease, adrenal fatigue/thyroid issue. The only signs he had before were seasonal itchy skin but not bad. I am saddened but would like to keep something further from going wrong. Also believe this could be turned around with proper nutrition as I do with most problems, even with us. Do you have any suggestions as to what I can add to his food that would benefit him. Thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Valerie,

      I don't know what type of food you are currently making for him but I would recommend this homemade food recipe as it offers many immune system boosting attributes http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/06/home-made-diy-dog-food-recipes-grain.html

      Also recommend that you add the following:

      A good probiotic - either via real food = yogurt, kefir, http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/07/dairy-products-cheese-kefir-yogurt-are.html or fresh sauerkraut, http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/05/foods-rich-in-probiotics-beneficial-for.html or a truly good probiotic supplement that conforms to this http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/05/how-to-choose-good-probiotic-supplement.html

      Add kelp (deep sea or Norwegian);

      Add Omega-3 fatty acids - either Norwegian Krill oil, Wild Alaskan Salmon oil or Norwegian Cod Liver Oil;

      Add vitamin C either in the form of http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/01/fresh-lemon-good-for-dogs-many-health.html or Ester C;

      Coconut Oil http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/02/coconut-oil-is-good-for-your-dogs.html

      Unpasturized raw honey ¼ tsp for every 20 pounds of body weight

      Billberies, beta-carotene, lutein, glutathione

      Rooibos Tea http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/06/health-benefits-of-red-rooibos-tea-for.html

      Cheers, Karen

      Delete
  15. Hi Karen, I have recently made some liver cake containing dried rosemary and sage. My dog was sick yesterday after eating some (although it wasn't the first time and hubby had also just given him an ice cube) and my friends dog had a seizure this week (I had given them some). Now I'm worried I have poisoned them but your site, to my great relief, says these two herbs are ok. Could it be the combination, perhaps I added to much and too much of the cake was given to the dogs. Or maybe it's just a co-incidence and I'm panicking over nothing? Very useful site, I shall be coming back. Many thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sage and rosemary are not toxic in and of themselves but if they were from a poor source they could have been contaminated with a toxic substance (i.e very high pesticide residue).

      The same could be said for the liver - it could have salmonella, it could be contaminated with a toxin.

      As well, organ meats are beneficial in small quantities daily - however can cause issues if ingested in large amounts daily.

      Cheers, K

      Delete
  16. What about italian seasoning that includes marjoram and thyme.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Dawn,

      Marjoram is very god for dogs and cats http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2013/11/marjoram-herb-for-dogs-and-cats.html

      As is Thyme.

      The only concern when you are using a culinary blend of herbs such as Italian Seasoning is that some also contain sugar and other undesirable items for dogs. So just check the ingredients to make sure no undesirables are included.

      Delete
  17. I've heard calendula has many benefits, not only topically but also when given internally. How could calendula be used? could it be fresh (flowers? stalks?) or maybe dry (sprinkled in food or as a tea?)

    thanks a lot!
    Ana

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ana - add to food at meal time in: tea form, dried flower, or dry powder form or tincture. It is the flower from which medicinal properties are derived.

      Yes topically it is good for ear infections, eye infections, skin infections etc.

      Do not give as an ingested supplement to pregnant dogs. Interacts with sedative drugs.

      Cheers, Karen

      Delete
  18. Is juniper, Uva ursi, and yellow burdock safe for my dog?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can read my article on Juniper Berries for dogs and cats. Burdock and uva ursi - both listed above as herbs for dogs. To know if these herbs are safe for use on your dog depends on drugs your dog may be on, health condition of your dog and how you use the herbs.

      Delete
  19. Your website is great, thanks so much for all the good info. My dog Ginger is in the hospital with pancreatitis, we are supposed to pick her up today but the doctors cant get her to eat at all...

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hello, my 70lb lab x is having major skin allergies :(. I was thinking of incorporating Echinacea, oil of oregano, milk thistle and golden seal. Is this all ok to give together and about how much a day can i give? Thx!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To address major skin allergies the approach should be three-fold -
      1) Root cause should be discussed;
      2) Overall diet needs to be looked at and addressed properly;
      3) Topical treatment should be addressed properly.
      Anything less will not resolve the problem. Adding herbs in isolation of 1, 2 and 3 is not a solution.

      Delete
  21. Is Lemongrass and Galangal good for dogs? can be eats or uses? how much dosage is safe?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Both are safe for dogs - follow the dosage chart provided in the article above

      Delete
  22. hi love your site! quick question, what about garlic chives? i have a dog who is very fussy when eating the garlic chopped up but she'll eat the scapes, but after awhile i know the scapes get depleted, so i was wondering if i could give her the garlic chives? thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Erica, no don't use garlic chive scapes. If your girl is fussy about eating garlic try putting some natural honey on the garlic.

      Make sure you follow the safe daily dosage for garlic / garlic scapes as provided in may article on garlic - also very important to follow the preparation method for feeding as provided in my article http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2012/06/garlic-for-dogs-health-benefits.html

      Make sure you understand how to select a good honey for your girl http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.ca/2014/01/honey-good-for-dogs-cats-honey-is.html

      Cheers, Karen

      Delete
  23. Your list states the Penny royal is safe and it also states that it is not safe for my dogs. How is this list any good if you are contradicting what is and isn't safe?

    Thanks for the time.
    David

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi David - Pennyroyal is safe for most dogs when used in moderation, topically

      Delete
  24. hi karen, i have a 11 year old jack rusel bitch who shakes quite a lot,Its as though her nerves/musels just over react some times. , in different parts of her body. As far i can work out she not in ayny pain. Is there any herb/spice you can recommend i could add to her diet to help?
    tks claire

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Claire for this type of issue - simply adding a herb is not going to address the problem. The diet and health regimen must be looked at to ascertain cause and appropriate intervention - for that you would require http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.ca/diet-nutrition-wellness-plans/

      Delete

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